Billets comportant le tag News

"Justice Coin" via Salon.com - Profiting off the bin Laden killing by Justin Elliott 

politico:

Oh, also, Sarah Palin will not be running for president in 2012. 

politico:

Oh, also, Sarah Palin will not be running for president in 2012. 

shortformblog:

producermatthew:

Photo by the Associated Press of the Reno, Nevada air show crash on Friday, September 16, 2011.
The pilot of a vintage WWII fighter plane nose-dived into a group of spectators at the Reno air show Friday evening. Eyewitnesses reported seeing bodies and body parts scattered throughout the runway.
Several graphic photos, including this one of a man with a severed limb, show the horror of the crash. Early estimates say three people have died and over 50 have been injured, some critically. [AP Photo]

Unbelievable timing. This is soon to be an award-winning photo.

shortformblog:

producermatthew:

Photo by the Associated Press of the Reno, Nevada air show crash on Friday, September 16, 2011.

The pilot of a vintage WWII fighter plane nose-dived into a group of spectators at the Reno air show Friday evening. Eyewitnesses reported seeing bodies and body parts scattered throughout the runway.

Several graphic photos, including this one of a man with a severed limb, show the horror of the crash. Early estimates say three people have died and over 50 have been injured, some critically. [AP Photo]

Unbelievable timing. This is soon to be an award-winning photo.

theatlantic:

Qaddafi with Mubarak and Ben Ali, One Year Ago

 
Taken less than a year before, the photo captured the ear-to-ear smiles of the leaders of several autocratic regimes. At the center of the photo stood Gaddafi, smiling and resplendent in his golden-brown robes and trademark sunglasses.
To his far left stood then-Tunisian President Zine El Abidine Ben Ali, laughing, and looking for all the world like he was invincible. To his right stood then-Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak, with Gaddafi’s elbow jauntily on his soldier.

 
Via The Washington Post

Un certain monde change/va changer. Reste à voir vers où, eux (et nous), allons aller. 

theatlantic:

Qaddafi with Mubarak and Ben Ali, One Year Ago

Taken less than a year before, the photo captured the ear-to-ear smiles of the leaders of several autocratic regimes. At the center of the photo stood Gaddafi, smiling and resplendent in his golden-brown robes and trademark sunglasses.

To his far left stood then-Tunisian President Zine El Abidine Ben Ali, laughing, and looking for all the world like he was invincible. To his right stood then-Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak, with Gaddafi’s elbow jauntily on his soldier.

Via The Washington Post

Un certain monde change/va changer. Reste à voir vers où, eux (et nous), allons aller. 

This video was taken at the Pukkelpop Music Festival, thursday 18 august 2011, in Belgium. It shows the power of a storm who distructed different parts of a stage, metal structures,…

At this point, this storm caused the death of 4 persons, and many others wounded. [Friday 19, 11.30 am]

———

Cette vidéo prise au Pukkelpop festival jeudi 18/08/2011 montre comment la force du vent et l’intensité de la pluie font s’envoler les grandes bâches d’un chapiteau. Surtout, à partir de 1’20”.

inothernews:

Photographer Amy Weston of the WENN Agency, who took what is probably the most iconic news picture to date of the London riots — a woman leaping from the window of a flat, toward the arms of persons below — tells the story of how she came upon the shot:

I was told there were fires in the Church Street area, near Surrey Street Market.
By  the time I drove towards it, I could already see the fires from my  windscreen.
There  were six or seven people screaming and crying outside, and they looked  like they lived at the flats that were burning. The flats were above  small independent shops. A man in a white shirt was screaming that a  girl was at the window and that she was ready to jump. He ran towards  her but riot police had appeared and pulled him back, and they went to  her instead.
As soon as she dropped, the crowds pushed back and  there was no way to see what happened to her. I remember hearing people  screaming that there were more people in the building. The crowds  started getting angry with each other, with one group blaming another  group for starting the fire.
There were warnings of gas cylinders  being fired into the crowd from riot police so I got out of there. I  couldn’t get to my car so I had to walk, wrapping my camera in my  clothes to avoid being mugged.

(Mandatory photo credit: Amy Weston / WENN.com via the Daily Mail / The Guardian)

inothernews:

Photographer Amy Weston of the WENN Agency, who took what is probably the most iconic news picture to date of the London riots — a woman leaping from the window of a flat, toward the arms of persons below — tells the story of how she came upon the shot:

I was told there were fires in the Church Street area, near Surrey Street Market.

By the time I drove towards it, I could already see the fires from my windscreen.

There were six or seven people screaming and crying outside, and they looked like they lived at the flats that were burning. The flats were above small independent shops. A man in a white shirt was screaming that a girl was at the window and that she was ready to jump. He ran towards her but riot police had appeared and pulled him back, and they went to her instead.

As soon as she dropped, the crowds pushed back and there was no way to see what happened to her. I remember hearing people screaming that there were more people in the building. The crowds started getting angry with each other, with one group blaming another group for starting the fire.

There were warnings of gas cylinders being fired into the crowd from riot police so I got out of there. I couldn’t get to my car so I had to walk, wrapping my camera in my clothes to avoid being mugged.

(Mandatory photo credit: Amy Weston / WENN.com via the Daily Mail / The Guardian)

5 small steps journalists can take to build a bigger, more engaged audience

By @mallarytenore | on Poynter.

Traffic on news sites isn’t just about page views and unique visits; it’s about people. To build an audience, you have to engage with your site’s users and develop strategies to help you maintain your current audience and attract new audiences, by giving them reasons to keep coming back.

Over the past year, I’ve taken small steps to drive traffic to Poynter.org and have found that they’ve made a big difference. I’ve listed the steps below, with additional ones from NPR’s Matt Thompson, The Huffington Post’s Mandy Jenkins, Facebook’s Vadim Lavrusik and the Associated Press’ Oskar Garcia

Read all these advices just here. Really interesting.